Donnie Warnock

What made you choose a career in personal fitness training?

I became fascinated with exercise in my early teens. I have spent my adult life in gyms, weight rooms, and doing all the body weight stuff. I can still do 1 arm pushups, 1 arm pullups. I’ve always known that I was a natural in the physical arena. I could sit down with any book or magazine involving fitness, bodybuilding, or lifting and absolutely read every article on every page. I came to believe that I was divinely built and gifted towards the fitness industry.

How long have you been a Personal Trainer?

My first certification was in the early 90’s, around 1993. approximately 25yrs now.

What made you choose the IFPA?

I was working for Gold’s Gym back in the early 90’s. I came in to work one day and saw a notice posted in the gym offering a certification program with IFPA. I looked into the particulars of getting this certification and the rest is history.

If you have taken more than our PFT course, what has been your favorite certification
course?

I have taken the Advance PFT course as well. The Advanced PFT is by far my favorite. It has challenged me beyond what most typical PT certifications provide.

What are some adjectives your clients would use to describe you?

Energy, and lots of it! Very motivational. Believes in my potential. Persistent to a fault.

What qualities set you apart from other personal trainers? 

Certainly the Advanced PFT gets me an advantage over my peers in PT. But, I personally think what truly sets me apart is my ability to come up with programs to parallel to just about any physical challenge that might be presented to me. I always tell my clients, “don’t worry, the well is deep and we’re not going to run out of things to do.”

What aspect of personal fitness training do you like most?

I am naturally a power athlete. I love the Olympic lifts. I love the technique involved in compound moves, how the body works like it was divinely made to work when muscles are used in synergy with other muscles. I don’t train much, either myself or my clients, in isolation. Bicep curls are rarely in my program. I’d much rather train biceps in pulling motions. Specifically pullups when capable and appropriate.

How has the PFT business changed since you started?

There so much emphasis on training for function now. And the group venue is all the rave now. There is so much knowledge on the ground level now that a trainer had better be well versed in his/her craft. You’re almost always visiting, or revisiting some form of exercise, or another medical condition that you’re recently hearing about.

How do you envision growing your personal training business?

First of all I feel like I peer with the largest marketing group of buyers in America today. The baby boomers. I always knew that when the boomers hit retirement age I would be right there with them to add “quality to their quantity.” I will use the highly respected IFPA level of Certification and my long history of training experience to market to Celebrities and increase my high end business and professional communities.

What was the hardest challenge you had to overcome in your personal training career?

Once again, the education level of many clients is so much greater than what it was when I first came into the business. Especially in the area of nutrition. It makes the trainer have to be in constant education mode. Plus, all the electronic tracking devices were not around when I got into training. I’ve learned to make the best out of whatever device the client feels like they have to have. I’ve learned to allow the client to track their own progress during a session and use that to our advantage in determining what we have accomplished.

What is your best success story?

Wow, There’s been a lot through the years. One of my most recent YMCA clients, a pastor, walked in to the Y in January 2016. I did a tour with him and his wife. As we completed the tour he told me that he had absolutely zero idea what to do in the Y. I gave him my business card and said I would be more than glad to help him in any way that he’d like for me to. Within a short time I got an email from him stating that he’d like for me to start training him. We got started right away. I have been training him now for the past 2 ½ years. His progress has been absolutely phenomenal. He is totally ripped. Other members are beginning to comment on his progress which is allowing me the option of marketing to other clients based on his progress.

What is your best advice to someone just starting their career as a personal trainer?

Take your time and learn from the best. Become your first and foremost project. Remember, what you want is the same as what your clients are going to want. You’ll never take someone where you haven’t already been yourself. Fitness is your art. It been said, it takes 10,000 hours to perfect a craft. You have plenty to time, and you can count all those hours that you’ve put into your own personal program.